Can Microwaves Be Used to Diagnose Bleeding from TBI?

Stroke-detecting technology using microwaves shows promise in detecting intracranial bleeding from traumatic brain injury. 

Treatment for severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) characterized by bleeding in the brain (intracranial) requires opening the skull to release pressure and remove clotted blood, called a hematoma. The survival rate is only ten percent if the hematoma is not removed within four hours. Getting a patient with an intracranial hematoma to a neurosurgical center with radiology facilities for a CT scan in the shortest amount of time then becomes a matter of life and death.

“It’s not so much an issue of being able to do more for them (TBI patients) pre-hospital wise, it’s a question of triage, of transporting them to the right hospital, and that’s a huge problem,” said Mikal Elam, chair of clinical neurophysiology at the University of Gothenburg.

Stroke Detecting Device May Detect Hematoma from TBI

The goal has been to find a portable device to detect bleeding from TBI at low cost to convey diagnostic information in a fast, non-invasive, and safe manner. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden are now considering applying an already existing, light-weight (under 10 pounds), portable stroke-detecting device called a Strokefinder to quickly diagnose intracranial bleeding at the site of a traumatic brain injury.

Built by Medfield Diagnostics, the Strokefinder is a tool already used to differentiate between strokes without a clot blocking blood flow and those that involve bleeding. Medfield is collaborating with Chalmers’ and Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska University Hospital on projects featuring the Strokefinder, believing doctors there would have a better idea of what they need than engineers at the company.

Here’s How It Works

The Strokefinder device a patient’s head is placed inside has eight microwave antennas on it, each one firing a small amount of microwave radiation through the brain (between 1/100th and 1/10th what you receive from a cell phone conversation), while the other antennas pick it up. The process is repeated at several different frequencies. The microwaves quietly progress through the tissue in different ways, depending on the consistency of the tissue, and are then filtered via an algorithm instead of an image, to enable the hematoma to stand out as either a stroke or a TBI. The patient can’t feel it working, and the entire process takes only 45 seconds. Once a hematoma is detected, the patient can be quickly transported to the correct hospital with a neurosurgical center.

By |April 21st, 2017|Brain Injury|

Oregon’s Hidden Senior Care Abuses

One of the most troubling decisions you may face in your lifetime is deciding whether or not a parent or senior relative should be placed in the care of a nursing home. In many cases, families do not have a choice as the health of their relatives depends upon a continuous cycle of care by doctors and nurses. One would hope that the caregivers and other personnel at these facilities are fully vetted, trained, morally noble and responsible individuals, eager to provide their best care and peace of mind to the families who rely on them. Unfortunately, with the number of abuse cases we see here at Rizklaw, this isn’t always the case.

Misleading Records

The number of incidents of senior care abuse is likely higher than anyone assumes, but we don’t have reliable information to draw from. There is no national database to keep track of abuse complaints, and agencies at the state level do a poor job. Most agencies dedicated to conducting investigations and filing reports are severely underfunded and understaffed.

What’s worse? In Oregon, the state’s taxpayer-funded website for consumers researching care facilities omitted nearly 8,000 substantiated abuse complaints against senior care centers. That’s 60% of all complaints filed. Complaints ranging from serious medical concerns like a fractured hip or medication mixups to complaints filed about valuables gone missing were deleted from the website, misleading consumers looking to place their relatives in the 600+ long-term care facilities throughout the state. Record of wrongful death due to negligence were also missing.

What little data remains on the website includes excruciatingly vague descriptions, such as “inadequate hygiene” or “exposed to potential harm.” In one instance, a resident of a northeast Portland facility fell in the middle of the night and started to bleed from the head. Rather than call upon a nurse to evaluate the situation more closely, the resident was placed back in bed by the caregiver on duty. The next day, the same resident complained of pain. It was discovered that the resident had suffered a fractured hip. After all this, the report online simply stated the outcome of the complaint as “unreasonable discomfort.”

If you are looking to place your parents in a facility, would “unreasonable discomfort” be enough

By |April 21st, 2017|Protecting Oregonians|

Top 7 Ways Forced Arbitration Harms Consumers

Arbitration is a dispute resolution alternative that aims to keep court costs down and quicken the time it takes to reach an agreement between two parties. Originally, arbitration was used to settle matters between two companies on equal footing. Today, arbitration is used by large corporations against consumers who are at a blatant disadvantage, having few resources and no power in the industry. While arbitration was first intended as an alternative for parties in mutual agreement of using arbitration instead of taking matters to court, these days millions of consumers are forced into it without even realizing it. Talk to an attorney if you believe you are bound by an arbitration clause in your personal injury case.

Where Can I Find Arbitration Clauses?

Arbitration clauses are hidden in contracts of everything from the terms and conditions of your credit or debit card to your cable, internet, or Netflix subscription. If you are a fan of shopping online, you may be surprised to know that Amazon’s Conditions of Use subjects shoppers to binding arbitration to resolve disputes. Even some healthcare providers hide these in the paperwork you have to fill out before a doctor will see you. Nursing homes and adult care facilities may also include arbitration clauses in their contracts, although changes to the laws allowing this are currently in progress.

How does Arbitration Hurt?

When a powerful entity such as a hospital is pitted against a single consumer, it rarely works out well for the consumer in the end. Arbitration is cheap for the company that mandates arbitration, and it is a high-cost pursuit for the claimant who wishes to proceed with the complaint. The “neutral third party” who is in charge of deciding an appropriate course of action is usually a retired judge, a judge who does arbitration as a source of extra income, or a lawyer trained in arbitration. These arbitrators have usually been hired several times by the same company and have a chummy relationship with the company, automatically inserting bias into the supposedly “neutral” nature of their position. Ultimately, forced arbitration is currently an accepted way for companies to strip consumers of their legal right to sue.

High Costs to Pursue Claim

To begin the arbitration process, claimants

By |April 12th, 2017|Protecting Oregonians|

Oregon PIP Insurance Update

“PIP”, an acronym for Personal Injury Protection, refers to medical and wage loss insurance benefits under your auto policy or the auto policy of the driver, if you were a passenger. PIP insurance is “no fault”. In other words, PIP benefits apply even if you were at fault.......

By |October 1st, 2009|Insurance Law|

US Supreme Court Protects Workplace Whistleblowers

In Crawford v. Metropolitan Government, the U.S. Supreme Court in January, 2009 unanimously declared that federal law protects workers from retaliation, even when the worker did not personally complain about discrimination on the job. Ms. Crawford asserted she was fired after cooperating with a......

By |January 26th, 2009|Misc|

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I am a personal injury attorney and an insurance attorney practicing in the Portland metro area. But what does that really mean? As a personal injury attorney, I help people who are injured due to the fault of another obtain fair compensation for injuries. A key is fault. Injuries that are......

By |November 19th, 2008|Misc|

An Examination Under Oath: Not Your Father

You have submitted a property loss claim or uninsured motorist claim[1] to your insurance company. So it can better understand the loss, your insurer asks to provide information and complete some forms describing your damage. You dutifully do so. Then, an overly legal letter arrives from......

By |November 13th, 2008|Insurance Law|

Oregon Supreme Court: Diminished Value Coverage, Auto Accidents

On October 23, 2008 the Supreme Court of Oregon decided a case which will likely require many insurance companies to pay for diminished value of a vehicle caused by an accident. In the decision, Gonzales v. Farmers Insurance, Oregon’s highest Court stated: "We hold that......

By |October 24th, 2008|Auto Accidents|

Understanding Insurance

What do cavemen, geckos, snoopy or a ditzy young girl have to do with insurance? Nothing! Insurance companies distract consumers with a barrage of entertaining yet often irrelevant information. No wonder few consumers know the truth about insurance. In this article, I hope to shed......

By |October 9th, 2008|Insurance Law|