Update on the Gorge Fire and Trail Openings

It’s time to head back to the Columbia River Gorge.

For the first time since the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire, seven of Oregon’s most popular trails reopened on Friday.

The moment was made possible by an army of volunteers that worked to stabilize trails hammered by flames and landslides.

By |November 28th, 2018|General News, Insights, Local News|

Providence Bridge Pedal 2018

As a South Portland personal injury law firm, we care about our community and the community’s safety. So for those of you participating in the Bridge Pedal, refresh on general bike safety before heading out! There will be thousands of riders present and bike courtesy and awareness will be essential to everyone’s safety. Also, remember to wear a good helmet and bring water!

By |August 8th, 2018|Community Events, General News, South Portland|

Springwater Corridor Trail: Closure

From July 9th until October 31st, a large section of the Springwater Corridor Trail is closed for a restoration project. Trail goers are still able to access the Wildlife Refuge,  the Oregon Yacht Club, as well as Oaks Amusement Park. Although if you were hoping to ride straight through the trail, that won’t be an option until the fall unfortunately. As much as it is a disappointment for summer cyclist, it is also a  beneficial project.

Occupy ICE Camp: Closed

Yesterday, Attorney and South Portland Business Association President Richard Rizk led a discussion with Portland’s Deputy Police Chief and a liaison from the Mayor’s office regarding the impact the “Occupy ICE Camp” has had on Macadam Ave in South Portland.

South Vs Southwest Portland

South Portland Business Association President, Attorney Richard Rizk, has been on top of the Southwest to South address change issue of late. This is an issue that affects many Southwest Portland businesses directly. Richard has been a voice for the people affected in this change.

Portland Votes for 20MPH Speed Limits

Portland City Council recently voted to set 20 miles per hour speed limits on residential streets. The council voted unanimously to reduce speeds to 20 mph from 25 mph in residential areas, which make up about 70% of the city’s street grid. The ordinance takes effect immediately on roads that lack speed limit signs. The council predicts that replacing all the 25 mph signs throughout the city will take until April and cost upwards of $300,000. Speed limits on arterial streets will not change.

Portland commissioners Amanda Fritz and Nick Fish strongly support the change. Ms. Fritz has had three family members killed in traffic collisions. She believes that excessive speed may have contributed to the death of her husband who died in 2014 in a car crash. Mr. Fish thinks law enforcement should work to enforce the policy, recalling a time driving through Northeast Portland when he drove the posted speed limits and surrounding drivers were visibly upset. […]

By |February 19th, 2018|General News|

Is Congestion Pricing Right for Portland?

The Oregon Department of Transportation recently invited the public to opine on the use of congestion pricing to improve the flow of traffic on the state’s vital highways: I-5 and I-205 in Portland. The state hopes to ease the volume of traffic on freeways, highways, and bridges in the gem of Oregon, known for around-the-clock rush hour. That’s right; traffic has officially gotten so bad that we are now considering congestion pricing to alleviate one of Portland’s greatest headaches.

This past December, Portland City Council and Mayor Ted Wheeler directed the Bureau of Transportation to study congestion pricing to see how using tolls on select portions of the city’s roads and bridges could reduce some of the congestion that is plaguing the city. ODOT recently hosted a series of open house events to receive public input. Residents were able to voice their opinions at several local events. If you missed out, you may still be able to submit comments and questions to the project team or submit feedback online. […]

By |February 5th, 2018|General News|

Oregon Daycare Suspended for Two Infant Deaths in Two Years

Long gone are the days where a typical two-parent household could survive on one income. With the exorbitant cost of living reaching unprecedented figures, most families require two working adults to stay afloat. As a result, working couples with young children are often forced to surrender their offspring to caregivers. Parents are overwhelmingly enrolling children in expensive daycare programs so that they can work to make ends meet. […]

By |January 22nd, 2018|General News|

Some Oregonians Can Now Pump Their Own Gas

A law that affects fewer than 300,000 Oregonians sparked a national debate on social media just days before it went into effect. On January first, Oregonians stepped into the new year with more freedoms they didn’t even want. House Bill 2482 allows gas stations in certain, rural parts of the state to offer self-service and is responsible for making Oregon the rear-end of all the gas-pumping jokes you may have heard lately. […]

By |January 8th, 2018|General News|

Will Portland Commuters Soon Pay Tolls on Local Interstates?

The Oregon Legislative Assembly pulled off its biggest achievement of the 2017 session: it approved a huge transportation bill (House Bill 2017) that seeks to raise $5.3 billion over the next ten years. By introducing tolls on interstate highways, new taxes, and raising current transportation taxes and fees, the state hopes to raise enough revenue to repair its failing infrastructure, expand public transit, and reduce highway traffic congestion.

The bill’s approval is a boon to legislators who have tried to pass a revenue-producing package to strengthen the […]

By |August 28th, 2017|General News|